Writing: Distractions & Social Awkwardness

photo of young man with long black hair
What I’m thinking Jonas, aka Raven, looks like in “Fairy Falls”.

So I wonder if other writes have awkward situations like I do? I’ve been kind of stuck on the Fairy Falls story. And I thought a change of venue would be a good thing. For some reason the background noise and the power of white chocolate mocha seem to tickle the muses.

I’m at the point in the story where I want to introduce the love interest to our protag. At the moment, I’m thinking he will be partaking of some personal adult behavior on a rather sacred stone when our hero stumbles upon him in the woods. (Yeah I know this sounds like the set-up of 85% of most porn films. I really hope it doesn’t come off that tacky. That’s why I’m kind of stuck on the scene.)

Anyway, I’m trying to get the hero out in the wood when the man I want naked wanking on the rock walks in to Starbucks. It was rather jarring. Now the photo in this post is how I envision Jonas. And the guy standing in line waiting for his latte doesn’t look exactly like the guy in the photo, but close enough that it is captivating, er, distracting. I kind of want to see if he moves and interacts like I imagine Jonas to. A photo is great but studying a real live person is so much more informative.

And this is where the awkward part comes in. How long can you look at a stranger before it becomes all stalker-creepy like? You begin to hear real life dialogue like, “Hey man, that old guy over there with the laptop is really perving on you.”

You could offer up that you are doing research. But then you might have to disclose what the research is for. Is it socially acceptable to say, “I was just wondering what you’d look like laying naked on a big rock in the middle of the woods masturbating?”

Would the police be moved by the plea, “It’s okay, I’m a writer.”?

Maybe I should stick to stock images.

Author: Stephen del Mar

Stephen del Mar lives in the Tampa Bay area and writes in the Southern Literary tradition. His stories are character driven with rich settings. They often have a touch of the paranormal, supernatural, or magical realism.

Although he writes about serious subjects, they are sweetened with humor and wit. He says, “It’s a southern thing.”